Agnieszka Radziwinowiczówna, Anna Rosińska, Weronika Kloc-Nowak. 2018.

Ethnomorality of Care: Migrants and their Aging Parents

 

Routledge, London and New York, 214 s.

Ethnomorality of Care: Migrants and their Aging Parents (Hardback) book cover

In our aging societies elderly care becomes one of major social concerns, especially in light of intensive outmigration. A new book by Centre of Migration Research researchers Agnieszka RadziwinowiczównaAnna Rosińska and Weronika Kloc-Nowak gives insights into how the physical distance challenges the family-centered elderly care, by juxtaposing transnational families with non-migrant families. The authors offer ethnomorality of care as a novel approach to research moral beliefs concerning care, as well as intentions and practical care arrangements, engaging various actors of care (kin and non-kin carers, market, public and non-governmental institutions). The book is a result of CMR’s MIG/AGEING research project conducted under the leadership of Prof. Marek Okólski and funded by NCN Maestro grant (grant number 2013/08/A/HS4/00602).

If interested in purchasing the book or ordering it for your library, you can buy it from the publisher with a 20% discount using this code at checkout: FLR40 or SOC19
https://www.routledge.com/…/Radziwinow…/p/book/9780815354031

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Abstract

What happens when migrants’ parents age and need care in mobile and aging societies? This book gives insights into how the physical distance challenges the family-centered elderly care, by juxtaposing transnational families with non-migrant families. It helps to better understand the lived experience of care receivers and givers, focusing not only on kinship care, but also on other social actors. “Ethnomorality of care” is a novel approach that explores moral beliefs concerning elderly care, as well as intentions and practical care arrangements. The concept of care presented in the book recognizes that national, regional, and local contexts, as well as economic inequalities, gender, care and migration regimes shape the experience of care. The authors present the findings of a multi-sited research carried out between 2014 and 2017 in Poland and the UK. The book centers on care in families of aging parents of migrants, however, the authors explain how researchers and practitioners can use ethnomorality of care approach to examine non-migrant families and other types of care. This book contributes to migration studies, transnational studies, aging studies, and social and cultural gerontology and will be of interest of academics, graduate students, policy makers, local authorities and care practitioners.

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